Giver or Taker ??

Have you ever been unemployed?  I have.  It’s happened a few times in my life.  I’m not talking about transitioning from one job to a new one.  I’m talking about not working in your profession.  It’s hard.

The reality of the financial implications hit first and you’re kind of taken over by fear.  You think that EVERYONE would want to hire you immediately, and that you’re sure to land your next job quickly.  That rarely happens. These items aren’t “new” and there are countless blogs and pieces of advice for jobseekers.

However, I think there’s a HUGE opportunity for HR to make a difference and turn the tide for people who are in transition.  Likewise, there’s a HUGE opportunity for jobseekers to take a different approach in their search as well.  It takes a different mindset for both sides of the unemployment quandary.

I grew up in Ada, Ohio (otherwise known as the center of the universe). It’s a rural village in Northwestern Ohio that can be compared to growing up in Mayberry from the Andy Griffith Show.  People are very down to earth and full of sage advice.  My Dad has lived in and around Ada his entire life.  He pulled me aside one day and said, “Steve, there are two types of people in this world – givers and takers.  You need to decide which one you’ll be.”

Givers and TakersI know my Dad didn’t come up with this saying. However, he and my Mom have been the model of givers in all areas of their lives.  I’ve tried to live this in my life as well.  It’s where HR needs to be too in my opinion.

I think HR folks should make themselves available for people in transition.  I have been working with people who are between jobs for years.  Here’s a big difference – I haven’t hired any of those people, and I haven’t charged them a dime for my time and efforts.  Sometimes, I meet for coffee, take a phone call, review a resume or make a call to someone as part of my network.  At the HR Roundtable I facilitate, people in transition are welcome to come, share their resume and network with HR pros to show others that they have always been talented pros themselves.  I truly get geeked when a person sends me an e-mail to tell me they’ve landed !!

You see, I believe great companies who hire great people will be companies that differentiate themselves from the pack.  Why wouldn’t I help other companies get better?  To me it’s the benchmark for great HR !!

Here’s what I’d like to challenge HR and jobseekers to do . . .

  • Intentionally network with each other even if the person in HR isn’t hiring.  HR folks know others in HR.  So, even if the company isn’t hiring, a person may open a door to someone who is !!
  • Don’t ignore the long-term unemployed HR.  Talented people are everywhere around us.  Look at people for what they bring to your company, not how long they’ve been between jobs.
  • Remember to help others first.  Too often jobseekers get their next job and forget the network who helped them land.  Don’t be a taker !!  Be forewarned on this.  Folks I know who have only used others to get a job are usually looking for another job in 18 months.  Avoid this behavior and keep networking.
  • HR folks – connect with other HR folks.  We still have miles to go before we truly become the “community” people write about.  Link In with each other.  Follow each other on Twitter.  Meet each other in person.  We can help others by being more connected ourselves.

Finally, understand that my Dad’s saying is true whether you read this and act or not.  So choose who you want to be.  I know this – by giving to others, my life is richer every day and I wish the same for you !!

 

Do You Love Your Job ??

Today is a first for Everyday People !!  I’m away on vacation with my amazing family, so I decided to have a guest post.  This is the first guest post ever for my blog, so I only have the BEST person to break this barrier – Dr. Daniel Crosby, PhD !!

Daniel is a dear friend and an incredible resource.  He is doing great work with Suited Jobs that you MUST check out !!   Suited is a tool that provides fit scores for
your company culture, job and provides suggestions for work that might better
suit you. Now, for the good Dr. !!

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One-sided relationships never work. This maxim sounds true, yet too many of us think that it doesn’t apply to our jobs.

Being highly committed to your job not only helps your employer, it helps you. Researchers have pointed out several benefits:

  • You’ll go above and beyond to be innovative and creative in your work.
  • You’ll be more motivated.
  • You’ll take less stress home with you.
  • You’ll be more likely to be recognized for your work.

Take an honest look at your relationship with your job. When was the last time you did something for your job you didn’t have to do? When was the last time you went out of your way for your job and didn’t complain? When was the last time you woke up excited to spend time with your job?

If the fire is no longer burning, just take a lesson from James Ziemer and find reasons to be committed to your work.

Love Your JobJames Ziemer, the former CEO of Harley-Davidson, started with the company in 1969. Only he didn’t start as an executive. He entered the organization as a lowly freight elevator operator. In this job, he was responsible for hauling motorcycle equipment from floor to floor. Only he wasn’t hauling just any old parts. To Ziemer, they were the crown jewels of the company.  In the years that followed, Ziemer became familiar with the operations of other parts of the business; he later worked in the manufacturing, engineering, accounting, parts and accessories, and finance departments. All of these experiences, in one way or another, would prove instrumental as he took on an executive role. Ziemer’s early experiences with Harley-Davidson were inextricable from the perspective he held while sitting at the top of the company.

Remember Ziemer’s story when thinking about your own work day. This new perspective can change how you look at mundane tasks and help to rekindle the old flame. Think of your job tasks as paving the way to something bigger and better.

Making cold calls? Sales skills will come in handy when negotiating your first large-scale acquisition.

Crunching numbers? You’ll need that skill when calculating your own salary.

Remember to look at the big picture. You might not be sitting pretty with your trophy job at the moment, but you’ll be proving to yourself that you are ready for more than just another quick Hollywood-type fling.